KHMU INFO <9> November 15, 2016 Thai Prisoner of Conscience Somyot Prueksakasemsuk Is Awarded The Jeon Tae Il Labour Prize

by 교선실장 posted Nov 15, 2016
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KHMU INFO <9> November 15, 2016

Thai Prisoner of Conscience Somyot Prueksakasemsuk Is Awarded The Jeon Tae Il Labour Prize

 

On November 13, the Jeon Tae Il Foundation(President Lee Soo-ho, Former president of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions) gave that Thai prisoner of conscience Somyot Prueksakasemsuk won the 24th Jeon Tae Il special Labour Award.

 

Established in 1988, the Jeon Tae Il Labour Award has been given to 7 individuals and 29 organizations up to last year. For this award, labor organizations and individuals nominate candidates, but the Jeon Tae Il Foundation judges select the final winner. The award ceremony is held at the “National Workers’ Rally in honor of the Spirit of Jeon Tae IL,” which takes place every year in early November.

 

This prestigious award within the labor community goes to those who have realized the spirit of Jeon Tae IL most completely. The final winner should be the one who has contributed the most to the labor movement, and civil and labor rights in terms of community organizing, commitment, morality, and deep affection and trust in human beings.

 

Before comrade Somyot, Korean labor activists and organizations have been the only award winners. But, this year, the Korean Health and Medical Workers’ Union (KHMU, President Yoo Ji-hyun) nominated our Thai brother Somyot, and the Foundation endorsed the health union’s recommendation. Hence, Somyot has become the first non-Korean winner of the prize.

 

Meanwhile, the Foundation decided to award Prize to Koran Railway workers’ Union and the same special prize to Chairman Han Sang-gyun of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU), who has been detained. Since both winners are in prison, no one can attend the award ceremony. For brother Somyot, his daughter Prakaidao Prueksakasemsuk travelled to Korea to receive the Jeon Tae-il Labour Prize on November 13. The Jeon Tae Il Foundation on November 13 gathers in the Moran Cemetery in Maseok, Kyeonggi Province to commemorate the 46th anniversary of Jeon Tae-il's death.

 

The special prizewinner Somyot (55) had been active in the labor movement for over three decades as an activist and a journalist before being imprisoned by the military regime on April 30, 2011. He was charged with so-called lese majeste. He received an 11 year sentence in 2013, but is currently serving a five year and six months prison-term.

 

Somyot formed the Centre for Labour Information Service and Training (CLIST). At CLIST, he unionized and trained workers in various industries such as chemicals, apparels, and automobiles, and thereby helped workers organize democratic labor unions and cemented solidarity among unionists. With a high level of interest in the Korean democratic labor movement, he has long been in touch with Korean labor movements since the 1990s. He organized trainings and exchanges between labor movement activities in Korea and Thailand and translated “March for the Beloved,” a flagship movement song of Korea into Thai as the “Solidarity Song.” The translated song soon became popular among Thai unionists.

Somyot has also been a leader in international solidarity activities. Whenever the Korean government oppressed the KCTU, he held a protest rally at the Korean embassy in Thailand.

 

The KHMU first got to know brother Somyot in 2008 when it ran a training program for Thai union executive activists in cooperation with Somyot. The KHMU has continued a campaign demanding his release, together with civic groups, after he was imprisoned. The KHMU strongly urge the Thai government to set free all political prisoners, including brother Somyot, immediately, on the occasion of this award presentation.

 

Jeon Tae-il (August 26, 1948–November 13, 1970) was a tailor in the Seoul Pyeonghwa Sijang (Seoul Peace Market). He is a legendary labor movement activist who burned himself to death, demanding that employers observe the Labor Standard Law in 1970. The founding of Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU) honored his spirit. The democratic union confederation holds the National Workers’ Rally to commemorate Jeon’s spirit every November. Jeon’s mother, Lee So-seon (December 30, 1929–September 3, 2011) devoted herself to the movement for workers’ rights and democracy on her son’s behalf after Jeon died. Ms. Lee has been called the “Mother of Workers.”

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Prakaidao Prueksakasemsuk, daughter of lese majeste prisoner and former labour activist Somyot, travelled to Korea to receive the Jeon Tae Il Labour Prize on 13, November

 

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▲Prakaidao attend the mass really with KHMU leadership on 12, November

 

 

See more;

 

http://bogun.nodong.org/english/

 

http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/politics/1134597/somyots-kin-receives-korean-award


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2008  Somyot





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< Prakaidao  Phurksakasemsuk Speech>


I am greatly humbled and honored to be receiving this award on behalf of my father. Somyot Phurksakasemsuk. I would like to offer my sincerest gratitude to the Korea Foundation of Chun Tae-il as well as Korea Health & Medical Workers' Union for the support for this honor.


My father has worked for labor rights since I was a little girl. He was always a busy father, rarely be at home with his family. But at the same time, he is a very respectable labor rights activist. Three days before I came here, my father told me that he might not be as great as Jeon Tae-il but he is inspired by his story. The death of Jeon Tae-il brought attention to the substandard labor conditions and helped the formation of labor union movement in South Korea. Still, the unfairness regarding working conditions remains and that’s why my father wishes to carry on Jeon tae-il’s will.


Growing up, I learned little by little what my father was doing out there, what change he would like to see in the world and why he kept fighting until he was sent to jail. The answer is just simple. It’s because we are all human. To be human is knowing that you are not alone in the world and that you can always make your life or the others’ life better. That’s the point of life.


I get to know my father through the first pages of newspaper and a lot of pictures. There is one picture of him in the cemetery of Jeon Tae-il. I cannot believe that today I’m standing at the same place he was. But it wasn't just doing nothing that made this possible; I wouldn't be here getting this award without all the effort my father put to improve worker’s life conditions.


Finally, as some of you may know about my father’s situation, he has been detained for more than five years only for exercising his legitimate right to freedom of expression. I wouldn’t be here if he isn’t imprisoned. All I want to ask for my father is just some encouragement from you, my fellow Koreans. We would like to get your support to send the letters to him to support his courage and long fight against the suppression of Freedom of Speech in Thailand. Please send the letters to the address following….


Somyot  Priksakasemsuk


At Bangkok Remand Prison, Section 1


33 Ngam wong wan road, Ladyao,


Jatujak, Bangkok 10900


Again, thank you.